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Brain-centered learning: School 2.0

February 15, 2012

Pediatric Neuropsychologist Dr. Steven J. Hughes

Leads Discussion of School 2.0

Monday, March 5, 2012

 The demands of life, work and school are changing in the 21st century. Are educators ready to meet the challenge? Dr. Steven J. Hughes is President of the American Academy of Pediatric Neuropsychology.  He leads a discussion of brain-centered learning in his seminar School 2.0 at the University of Texas at Dallas on Monday, March 5, 2012 from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Presented by the Montessori Institute of Texas in partnership with UT Dallas’ Center for Children and Families, the workshop will be held in the Clark Conference Center on the University of Texas at Dallas campus, 800 West Campbell Road in Richardson, 75080.  Registration is required. Admission is $20.00 per person and $15 for students with an I.D. Tickets must be purchased in advance. Parking passes will be provided with online registration.

School 2.0 will focus on preparing children for the changing workforce of the 21st century, the need for developing creative problem solving skills, the importance of socialization and the ability to work in a collaborative environment. “What traditional education was designed for may no longer be relevant in this era,” says Dr. Hughes. “People aren’t going to enter the workforce and have one career for the rest of their lives. They’re going to have many careers and many jobs. Children need to be prepared to work with new situations, size things up and figure out a sensible way forward.”

A specialist in the assessment of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Dr. Hughes works in the area of cognitive training, using programs designed to improve attention and concentration skills in children with related learning and behavioral problems. He’s a proponent of Montessori teaching practices which foster wide-scale human development, embracing creativity and self expression. Dr. Hughes proposes the creation of a new field to develop  different standards of educational practice.

ABOUT DR. STEVEN J. HUGHES

Steven J. Hughes, PhD, ABPdN, is the President of the American Academy of Pediatric Neuropsychology. A pediatric neuropsychologist based in St. Paul, Minnesota, he is also Chair of the Global Research Committee of the Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) in Amsterdam, and a member of the faculty of the Maria Montessori Institute in London.  Formerly an assistant professor in the University of Minnesota Medical School, Division of Pediatric Clinical Neurosciences, Dr. Hughes has also worked in the test publishing industry. His research interests are in the area of attention and executive functioning, and the role of early childhood education in promoting the development of these capabilities. Dr. Hughes is an advocate for activity-based, developmental approaches to education, and is a frequent speaker for and consultant to educational organizations across the world. Additional information is available at http://www.goodatdoingthings.com/

ABOUT THE MONTESSORI INSTITUTE OF TEXAS

The Montessori Institute of Texas (MIT) was formed in the fall of 1999 as a coalition of teachers, administrators, and interested persons for the purpose of establishing an Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) teacher training center in the DFW Metroplex. MIT provides ongoing support and continuing education for Montessori teachers, administrators, parents and the wider community. MIT is a dynamic example of collaboration among diverse entities, and is an open organization. The organization offers speaker seminars and workshops to the community-at-large with the goal of reaching a broad spectrum of people in the public and private sectors who are involved in the educational process. More information is available at http://www.montessori-mit.org/pages/home.php

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