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Understanding the high stakes nature of STAAR and EOC (End of Course Exams)

February 18, 2013

Perhaps you have heard about the revolution against standardized testing. Are you wondering what all the fuss is about? After all, standardized testing has been going on for decades. We have become accustomed to testing to the point that we have become complacent. In reality, the STAAR has dramatically changed the standardized testing regimen by making the series of tests even more high stakes than before.

Did you know:

• To receive a high school diploma, each high school student must now pass 15 tests under STAAR (these tests are called End of Course Exams (EOCs)).
• A student can pass all of the EOCs and still not be eligible to attend a 4 year Texas university if the score on Algebra II and English III is not high enough.
• Students must obtain a high enough cumulative score on all of the tests to graduate high school.
• The State of Texas has spent $1.2 BILLION dollars in the past 15 years on standardized testing.
• The State of Texas points to increased state scores to show student improvement, yet SAT and ACT scores have flat lined across the state.

The future of each student rests on how well he does on each individual test. We are fortunate to live in a school district that offers choices in courses. A student may decide to take AP, IB, GT, blended learning, PBL, dual credit, career-focused, or regular classes (to name a few). The state-imposed standardized tests can’t help but influence the curriculum and focus of the classroom by reducing performance to a flat measure instead of a reflection of individual student growth and interest.

Are you interested in finding out more about the changes imposed by STAAR and End of Course Exam requirements?
February 28, 2013
12noon & 7pm
CHS Lecture Hall

Discussion hosted by Coppell Parents for Authentic Student Assessment (CoppellPASA) and featuring a presentation by state-wide, non-partisan organization Texans Advocating for Meaningful Student Assessment (TAMSAtx). If you have any questions, contact@coppellpasa.org.

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